The [email protected] Federation Schools Online Curriculum Content Initiative
    Education Services Australia

    Frequently asked questions

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    About The [email protected] Federation

    About The [email protected] Federation resources

    Accessing and licensing The [email protected] Federation resources

    Setting up your system to view and use The [email protected] Federation resources

    Disabling pop-up blockers

    Plug-ins for using The [email protected] Federation resources

    Adobe Flash Player

    Adobe Reader

    Adobe Shockwave

    Viewing and using The [email protected] Federation resources

    Downloading The [email protected] Federation resources

    Reporting issues

     

    About The [email protected] Federation

    Is The [email protected] Federation a government body?

    The [email protected] Federation is owned by the participating state, territory and federal governments of Australia and is managed by Curriculum Corporation. The Curriculum Corporation Board oversees the Project and reports to the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA) through the Australian Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs Senior Officials Committee (AEEYSOC).

    How long has The [email protected] Federation been operating?

    The [email protected] Federation was established in July 2001 and is funded until June 2010.

    Who funds The [email protected] Federation?

    The transition year (2009–10) is funded by the Australian, Australian Capital Territory, Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australian, Tasmanian, Victorian and Western Australian governments.

    Previous phases of the project (2001–09) were funded by the state, territory and federal governments of Australia and New Zealand.

    Is The [email protected] Federation responsible for delivering digital curriculum resources to schools?

    Responsibility for delivering The [email protected] Federation digital curriculum resources to schools lies with the education departments of the Australian states and territories, and New Zealand. The [email protected] Federation works with those jurisdictions to assist with implementation.

    To find out how Australian and New Zealand primary, secondary and tertiary teachers and students can access The [email protected] Federation resources, visit the Access information page.

    To find out how universities, TAFE institutions and other organisations can access The [email protected] Federation digital curriculum resources, visit the Universities and TAFE institutions page.

    About The [email protected] Federation resources

    What is a digital curriculum resource?

    The [email protected] Federation's digital curriculum resources are materials developed for students and teachers in a variety of formats, including:

    • interactive multimedia learning and assessment objects
    • single item resources from our partner organisations, including:
      • still images including speeches, songs, interviews, photos, artwork, posters, maps, documents and cartoons
      • sound files including speeches, songs, radio broadcasts and interviews
      • moving images from documentaries, feature films, newsreels and TV programs
    • teacher ideas, which highlight ways teachers have incorporated digital curriculum resources into their learning programs
    • collections, which are selections of digital curriculum resources based around popular topics and themes in the curriculum.

    See also FAQ Can I sample a digital curriculum resource? page.

    What is metadata?

    Metadata is data that describes the characteristics of an item. It is fundamental to the discovery of digital curriculum resources. The creation of accurate metadata by a publisher enables that metadata to be reused downstream in learning management systems.

    If you have downloaded a learning object, you can view the metadata associated with it by unzipping the downloaded file and then opening the extracted folder. At the top level (ie without needing to open further folders), you should see a file called 'description.html'; that file contains the metadata for the object.

     

    Accessing and licensing The [email protected] Federation resources

    How can I get The [email protected] Federation resources in my school?

    Your education authority makes The [email protected] Federation digital curriculum resources available to schools in your sector. Schools cannot get the resources directly from The [email protected] Federation. Visit the Access information page for information about how your school can access the resources.

    For personalised assistance, you can also get in touch with your local Contact Liaison Officer.

    Licences are also available for Australian, New Zealand and international education sectors. To find out more, visit the License our content page.

    Are materials published by The [email protected] Federation exempt from Copyright Agency Limited (CAL)?

    Yes, they are exempt. Licensees do not need to comply with the requirements of any statutory licences when using The [email protected] Federation resources.

    Some resources are created by The [email protected] Federation employees and by organisations contracted to provide content. Other content is licensed from third parties in return for valuable consideration. Licences from third parties allow The [email protected] Federation to reproduce and communicate material and also allow educational institutions to reproduce and communicate material for the purposes of the institution.

    Copyright in The [email protected] Federation content is owned by Curriculum Corporation. Non-The [email protected] Federation content can be recognised by an acknowledgment statement.

    The following are relevant The [email protected] Federation licensing arrangements:

    • Licence A – this relates to the provision of The [email protected] Federation content to a government school system;
    • Licence E – this relates to the provision of non-The [email protected] Federation content to a government school system;
    • Licence D – this relates to the provision of both The [email protected] Federation content and non-The [email protected] Federation content to a body administering non-government schools.

    Schools that hold these licences can legally copy and communicate relevant material without incurring CAL costs.

    Can I sample a digital curriculum resource?

    Yes, you can. The [email protected] Federation offers samples of digital curriculum resources on the What's new page.

    The page is updated quarterly with a selection from the most recent content release.

     

    Setting up your system to view and use The [email protected] Federation resources

    What are The [email protected] Federation's current technical specifications for viewing resources? (What browsers and operating systems are supported?)

    For information about The [email protected] Federation's current technical specifications, please visit the Software and hardware requirements page.

    Do The [email protected] Federation resources work in Firefox?

    Yes, all The [email protected] Federation resources will work in Firefox on a PC.

    The [email protected] Federation resources are embedded in the XHTML page to ensure cross-platform compatibility. The syntax works for all supported platforms, but specific information must be included in the .css (stylesheet) to ensure that the resources render in Gecko-based browsers such as Firefox and Netscape 7.

    For more technical information about the embed syntax and the stylesheet solutions see the 'Supporting Gecko browsers (Netscape 7 and Firefox)' section in the Techniques for creating valid XHTML pages document.

    At what screen resolution are The [email protected] Federation resources best viewed?

    The [email protected] Federation resources are optimised for display and tested to run on a screen resolution of 1024 pixels x 768 pixels.

    All Flash resources will scale gracefully and be fully visible at 760 pixels x 570 pixels. So they will display accurately in most learning management systems.

    Many factors ultimately determine the final dimensions of the available area, so the following should be used as a guide.

    Where a web page contains standalone embedded objects, each object should be completely visible and operate successfully when it is displayed in an area of 760 x 570 pixels. This represents a 4:3 aspect ratio on a monitor with a screen resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels (less the header and navigation areas). Some learning objects that are not developed in Flash will not scale, requiring you to scroll. This is due to restrictions in the technology used.

    For netbooks with resolutions lower than 1024 x 768 pixels, and where the resource does not have the ability to scale, the content should present in a way that allows the user to scroll with the browser.

     

    Disabling pop-up blockers

    What is a pop-up blocker?

    A pop-up blocker prevents pop-up webpages from appearing.

    Sometimes when you open a webpage, it will launch a smaller pop-up page that includes advertising material. Many companies have developed ways to prevent such advertisements from appearing. The solution is generally referred to as a pop-up blocker.

    What issues do pop-up blockers present for The [email protected] Federation resources?

    As well as blocking advertisements, some pop-up blockers can also prevent pages from appearing if the pages use plug-ins such as Flash, Director and QuickTime. As such, some pop-up blockers may prevent The [email protected] Federation resources from appearing.

    In addition, The [email protected] Federation's Analyser tool, which you can use to check that you have all of the plug-ins you need to use The [email protected] Federation resources, may not work if a pop-up blocker is active.

    How do I disable pop-up blockers for particular websites?

    Pop-up blockers can work independently of each other, and so it is possible to have several layers of pop-up blockers on your machine. For example, you can have a pop-up blocker built into your browser and a third-party blocker installed in your browser's toolbar. If you turn off one blocker, the other blocker will still be active.

    You can configure each blocker to allow or disallow pop-ups from specific websites. The list of websites is generally referred to as a 'whitelist'. To allow pop-ups for a particular website, all of your blockers must include that site on their whitelist(s). (Find out how by reading the documentation for each blocker.)

    If you have multiple blockers associated with your browser, consider disabling all except your preferred blocker.

    Please note: The Analyser tool (see 'What is the Analyser tool and where can I access it?') currently uses JavaScript to open new windows. If you are running the Analyser from the Software and hardware requirements page, please ensure that The [email protected] Federation's website (http://www.thelearningfederation.edu.au) is on your whitelist(s).

     

    Plug-ins for using The [email protected] Federation resources

    What is the Analyser tool and where can I access it?

    The [email protected] Federation resources are designed to be viewed within learning management systems and web browsers using specific browsers and browser plug-ins in tested operating systems. You can use the Analyser tool to check that you have all of the software you need to use The [email protected] Federation resources. The tool tests your software and, if necessary, provides instructions for how to update your system.

    You can access the Analyser tool from the Software and hardware requirements page.

    What is a plug-in?

    A plug-in is additional software that works in conjunction with your web browser. It allows you to operate and load a wider range of resources than would be possible with your web browser alone. Specific plug-ins enable you to run enhanced graphics (Adobe Flash Player), sound (QuickTime Player), three-dimensional animation (Adobe Shockwave Player) and other rich media.

    In general, you can download plug-ins for free and they will work seamlessly with your browser.

    What is a learning management system (LMS)

    A learning management system (LMS) is an application that is used by teachers to manage and organise digital curriculum resources for presentation to students.

    What are administrator rights?

    Administration privileges provide users with permission to install software onto a computer and to change and add system settings and services. You gain administrator rights by being a member of a group that has administration privileges.

    Without any administrator rights, you may not be able to install or change any settings. Full administrator rights give you access to any aspect of the system and its setup. There is a sliding scale of rights between these two extremes.

    For more information, see: 'How do I check if I have administrator rights on my computer?'

    How do I check if I have administrator rights on my computer?

    If you are running Windows XP, right-click on the Start button (generally located at the bottom left of your screen). If the menu that then appears next to the Start button contains the items 'Open All Users' and 'Explore All Users', you have administrator rights on your computer.

    If you are running Windows 2000, right-click on My Computer on the desktop, then select Properties. Select the Computer Name tab. If the Change box is available, you have administrator rights; if it is greyed out you do not.

    If you are running Mac OS X, go to System Preferences, then select Accounts under the System heading. The user account that you are currently logged in as should be selected. If the checkbox next to 'Allow user to administer this computer' is checked, then you have administrator rights.

    If you do not have administrator rights, please seek IT support.

    I can't get some or all Java-based resources to work. What might be wrong?

    Some resources published by The [email protected] Federation use Java applets. To run the applets successfully your browser needs a Java plug-in. You can confirm that you have the correct version of Java by running the Analyser tool, accessible from the Software and hardware requirements page.

    If on your system some applets work and some do not it is likely that your installation of Java is corrupted. In that scenario, it is recommended that you uninstall the Java plug-in and then download and run the offline installer from http://java.com/en/download/manual.jsp.

     

    Adobe Flash Player

    What is Adobe Flash Player?

    Adobe Flash Player is a plug-in that you need to run some The [email protected] Federation resources.

    Is a supported version of Adobe Flash Player installed on my computer?

    To check whether you have a supported version of Adobe Flash Player installed on your computer, go to the Software and hardware requirements page and run the Analyser tool.

    If a window does not appear when you select the link to the Analyser, you may have a pop-up blocker installed. For more information about pop-up blockers, see the following questions:

    How do I install Adobe Flash Player?

    1. Download the latest version of Adobe Flash Player from Adobe.
    2. Ensure that all applications are closed, then run the Flash Player executable file you have downloaded.
    3. Restart your computer.

    If you have difficulty installing Adobe Flash Player, please see: 'I can't install Adobe Flash Player – what should I do?'

    I can't install Adobe Flash Player – what should I do?

    If you have difficulty installing Adobe Flash Player, follow the steps below. If one step does not correct the problem, continue to the next step.

    1. Check that you have administrator rights on your computer. (See 'How do I check if I have administrator rights on my computer?')

    On Windows 2000 or XP, if you do not have administrator rights you may not be able to install Flash Player. Administrator rights are required for the Windows system registry and for the C:\WINDOWS\system32\Macromed\Flash folder.

    On Mac OS X, if you do not have administrator rights you may not be able to install Flash Player. The right required for this is 'system.privilege.admin'.
    1. Ensure that all applications are closed.
    Before installing Flash Player exit all applications, including browser applications (for example, Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari), and email and instant messenger applications. If using Windows, check the system tray (the small icons at the bottom right of your screen). If an application in the tray uses Flash Player, right-click on it and select Exit.
    1. Uninstall all previous versions of Flash Player.
    Before you install Flash Player for any Windows browser, uninstall all previous versions. Full instructions are available at the Adobe technote 'How to uninstall the Adobe Flash Player plug-in and ActiveX control'.

    After you have uninstalled previous versions of Flash Player, restart your machine and then install the latest version as described below.

    1. Download Adobe Flash Player from the Adobe site.
    2. Ensure that all applications are closed (see Step 2), then run the Flash Player installer you have downloaded.
    3. Restart your computer.
    1. Run the Analyser tool.

    You can access the Analyser tool from the Software and hardware requirements page.

    If a window does not appear when you select the link to the Analyser, your browser may have a pop-up blocker. For more information about pop-up blockers, see the following questions:

    If the Analyser detects that you have successfully installed Adobe Flash Player 9 then you should be able to run all The [email protected] Federation digital curriculum resources.

    If the Analyser does not detect the plug-in or if you are unable to run a learning object, please refer to the question 'What do I do if my Flash Player installation doesn't work?'

    What do I do if my Flash Player installation doesn't work? (I have installed Flash Player 9, but the Analyser tool cannot detect it and I cannot run learning objects.)

    If you have followed the steps outlined in the question 'I can't install Adobe Flash Player – what should I do?' and your Flash Player installation still doesn't work, please read on.

    If you are using Internet Explorer for Windows, first go to the question 'I can't install Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer – what should I do?' However, if the steps in that question don't fix your problem or if you are using another browser, the following are the most common reasons for Flash failing to display.

    1. You have used a third-party Flash Player 'cleaner'.
    Non-Adobe 'cleaners' can cause Flash Player problems. If you have run any type of registry cleaner or other tool to fix an issue with Flash Player, then Adobe suggests that you run the clean uninstaller discussed in the Adobe document 'Safe versions security restrictions when installing Flash Player'.

    After you have run the uninstaller, restart your computer, then follow the steps outlined in the question 'I can't install Adobe Flash Player – what should I do?'

    1. Some pop-up blockers and advertisement blockers specifically target Flash content. For more information about pop-up blockers, see the following questions.
    1. Some Internet utilities, such as Norton Internet Utilities, perform functions similar to a firewall and may prevent you from viewing ActiveX controls. In some cases they will specifically block Flash content. To use The [email protected] Federation resources, set your firewall or utility settings to allow ActiveX controls and Flash (SWF) content.

    I can't install Adobe Flash Player in Internet Explorer for Windows – what should I do?

    There are several factors that may cause problems with the installation of Flash Player ActiveX controls in Internet Explorer. Some of these factors and their solutions are outlined below.

    ActiveX settings
    If you are part of a network your browser security settings are often chosen by your system administrator. In some cases those settings may restrict you from downloading and running ActiveX controls.

    If you have administrator rights (see 'How do I check if I have administrator rights on my computer?') you can change your ActiveX security level settings by following the steps outlined below.

    1. Open Internet Explorer and from the toolbar, select Tools, then Internet Options.
    2. Select the Security tab, then select Custom Level.
    3. Under the subheading 'ActiveX controls and plug-ins':
    • set 'Download signed ActiveX controls' to Prompt;
    • set 'Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins' to Prompt.
    1. In the drop-down box, under the subheading 'Reset custom headings' ensure that your security level is not set to High or to a custom level that does not allow viewing of ActiveX controls.

    If changing your security settings does not resolve the issue, you may need to repair a damaged Windows system registry or incorrect permissions. However, before doing so please make sure that you have exhausted the steps in 'I can't install Adobe Flash Player – what should I do?' and 'What do I do if my Flash Player installation doesn't work?'

    System registry and permissions
    Flash Player and other programs may fail to install if there are incorrect permissions in the registry or if there are missing access control lists (ACLs) for the administrators' group or for the built-in system account.

    Symptoms of a damaged registry or incorrect permissions may include the following.

    • You receive an error during Flash Player installation with the message 'Failed to install. For Troubleshooting please see: http://www.adobe.com/go/tn_19166'.
    • Flash Player seemingly installs without error, but Flash content is not viewable in Internet Explorer.
    • Some websites tell you that you do not have the correct version of Flash Player, even though you have installed the latest version.
    • Some websites ask you to reinstall Flash Player and continue asking you after you have reinstalled it.
    • The download confirmation animation on the Adobe website constantly indicates that it is loading.

     

    You can clean the registry and fix permission issues using SubInACL from Microsoft. However, please note the following warning before continuing.

    Using the SubInACL involves the Windows system registry. Editing or manipulating the Windows system registry incorrectly can result in serious system damage which may require reinstallation of the operating system.

    If you are certain that you have the right security level you should refer to the FAQs under the Adobe Flash Player subheading before making changes to the registry.

    1. If you are working within a school system, please refer the problem to the IT support staff. If you are an individual user who is not comfortable editing the registry, please take your system to a professional.
    2. If you choose to proceed, it is essential that you create a complete system backup and a Windows system restore point before proceeding. Curriculum Corporation and The [email protected] Federation cannot be held responsible for damage resulting from the information below.
    3. Download the SubInACL tool from Microsoft, following the instructions outlined on the download page.
    4. Install SubInACL.
    5. Download the reset_minimal.zip file from Adobe, following the instructions outlined on the download page.
    6. From the zip file, extract the reset_minimal.cmd file to C:\Program Files\Windows Resource Kits\Tools.

    Please note: it is important that both the subinacl.exe and reset_minimal.cmd files are in the same location: C:\Program Files\Windows Resource Kits\Tools.

    1. Double-click reset_minimal.cmd. This will open a command window and execute the SubInACL tool.

    Do not use the computer while SubInACL is running.

    1. When SubInACL has finished running, you will see the message 'Press any key to continue'.
    2. You should now be able to install Flash Player by following the steps outlined in the question 'I can't install Adobe Flash Player – what should I do?'

    Previous installations of Flash Player
    If you previously installed a later version of Flash Player for Internet Explorer, you may be prevented from installing an earlier version due to the registry key settings applied by the Flash Player security model. The restriction prevents users from downgrading Flash Player minor versions. The minor version of Flash Player is the third set of numbers in the version name. For example, the minor version for Flash Player 9.0.124.0 would be 124. If Flash Player 9.0.124.0 were installed and you attempted to install 9.0.115.0 (minor version 115), then the installation would fail.

    1. To resolve the issue, first download the uninstaller for Flash Player.
    2. Select Start > Run.
    3. Type cmd in the Open box, and then press Enter.
    4. In the command window, type uninstall_flash_player.exe /clean.
    5. Please note: the uninstall_flash_player.exe file must be saved to the same directory that the command window is in (for example C:\).

    The ActiveX control for Flash Player fails to install
    If the information in this and previous questions has not resolved the issue and the ActiveX control for Flash Player still fails to install, downloading the executable Flash Player installer may help. In particular this may be of assistance if you are having trouble with the on-demand ActiveX installation from adobe.com or there are firewall issues.

    1. Save the installer to your desktop.
    2. Close all applications.
    3. Run the installer.
    4. To confirm that Flash Player has installed successfully, run the Analyser tool (accessible from the Software and hardware requirements page).

     

    Adobe Reader

    How do I install Adobe Reader?

    To install Adobe Reader, download the installer file directly from Adobe's website.

     

    Adobe Shockwave

    What is Adobe Shockwave?

    Adobe Shockwave is a plug-in that you need to run a small number of The [email protected] Federation resources built in Director; the majority of these resources (which include the 'Finders Keepers' and 'Sonic' series) involves three-dimensional rendering.

    Some Flash files can be played on a Shockwave player, but not vice versa. Shockwave's functionality can be extended with 'Xtras' and as a result The [email protected] Federation resources always require the 'full installer' version of the plug-in.

     

    Viewing and using The [email protected] Federation resources

    How can I make The [email protected] Federation resources run faster?

    Your available bandwidth and the location of the resources you are using can cause resources to run slowly. Solutions include increasing your bandwidth or downloading the resource and then running it from a local location such as your harddrive.

    The [email protected] Federation resources are developed for users with dedicated 64kbit ISDN internet connections. If you have a dial-up connection the resources may work, but they will be slow. Some resources will not operate at all.

    Multimedia digital curriculum resources are designed to stream in such a way that they load in small chunks rather than all at once. If you have a slow internet connection, that can cause delays in the performance of the object – not only while waiting for it to load, but also after it has loaded. The faster your dedicated connection, the less noticeable the delay in server-accessed resources.

    If you access The [email protected] Federation resources from a server that has multiple users, you may find that the resources get slower as more users access the server – particularly if you have a lower-end specification server with many applications running on it. While such a server is a best-practice scenario for distributing resources, the server needs to be monitored and regular administrative tasks need to be performed.

    To improve performance, you may need to increase your bandwidth or upgrade your server. Alternatively, you can run The [email protected] Federation resources from a local location.

    The [email protected] Federation resources may run faster if you download them to a local location such as your harddrive before you need to use it. For more information about how to open an item once you have downloaded it, see 'How do I open The [email protected] Federation resources that I have downloaded?'.

    How can I find out the unique identification number and the version number of the resource I am using?

    Every digital curriculum resource produced by The [email protected] Federation has a unique identification number. Interactive multimedia resources are prefaced with an 'L' or 'LO'. Single items such as moving and still images are prefaced with an 'R'. The numbers are automatically generated by the content repository that is used to store and publish resources.

    If you are using a web browser to view the item, the identification and version numbers will appear in the header of the browser.

    If you are using a learning object in a learning management system that displays the learning object with a lesson, you may be able to view the identification and version numbers by downloading the learning object, saving it to your harddrive and opening it in a web browser.

    Alternatively, if you are using Windows, right-click on the far left or right of the learning object so that a short-cut menu appears. Select 'Properties' (in Internet Explorer) or 'View page info' (in Firefox) to view the identification and version numbers. If you are using Mac OS X, go to the Safari context menu and select 'View', then 'View source'.

    I can't view the characters in the Chinese and Japanese learning objects. What should I do?

    For optimal performance, some The [email protected] Federation resources that contain Chinese and Japanese characters require that system or device fonts be installed. The fonts are not always installed by default.

    • Windows 2000 and Windows XP do not have the recommended fonts installed by default. However, the fonts are available on your installation disks and can be installed if you have administrator rights.
    • In Windows 2000, go to Control panel > Regional options > General. Then, select Japanese, Simple Chinese, Traditional Chinese.
    • In Windows XP, go to Control panel > Fonts > Languages > Install East Asian characters.
    • Apple Mac OS X's default installation includes Asian language fonts. If the fonts are not installed on your system, they are available on the OS X installation disks.

     

    Downloading The [email protected] Federation resources

    How do I open The [email protected] Federation resources that I have downloaded?

    When you download The [email protected] Federation resources to a local location, it will generally be packaged in a zip file. First, extract the files and folders from the zip file.

    • Digital curriculum resources from partner organisations: to view a digital resource with its educational value statement, open the 'description.html' file in a web browser. If the item is a still image, you can view a larger image by selecting the image that appears beside the educational value statement. Similarly, if the item is a video or audio clip, you can play it by selecting the image beside the educational value statement.
    • Multimedia digital curriculum resources (Learning objects): to run a learning object that you have downloaded, open the 'index.html' file in a supported web browser such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

    Please note: for earlier learning objects, you may need to open the 'default.html' file in a supported web browser such as Internet Explorer or Firefox.

    Please note: for earlier learning objects, you may need to open the 'default.htm' file rather than the 'index.html' file.

     

    Reporting issues

    How do I report a problem with a digital curriculum resource?

    Before you report a bug in a resource, please run the Analyser tool (accessible from the Software and hardware requirements page) to check that you have all of the software you need to use The [email protected] Federation resources. If the Analyser indicates that you do not have the correct software please update your plug-ins and then check whether the bug still occurs.

    To report a bug, please email: [email protected].

    We need the following information.

    • Browser (type and version number – for example, Firefox 2.0.0.14)
    • Operating system (type and version number – for example, Windows XP)
    • Plug-in (type and version number – for example Flash Player 9.0.115)
    • Screen resolution – for example 1024 x 768 pixels

    Note: an easy way to provide us with the information is to run the Analyser tool linked from the Software and hardware requirements page and attach a screen capture of its assessment of your system to your email.

    We also need to know the following.

    • Playback location (local disk, server, CD or learning management system)
    • Version number of The [email protected] Federation item
    • Identification number of The [email protected] Federation item
    • Full title of the learning object

    For more information about finding the version and identification numbers, see 'How can I find out the unique identification number and version number of the resource I am using?'

    It would also help if you could give us:

    • screen captures of the problem;
    • additional information about the steps leading up to the bug so that we can try to replicate the problem.
    For example:

      1. I opened the 'Number trains' learning object (LO ID: 2317; version 2.0.0) via MyClasses.
      2. I selected 'next' on the introduction screen.
      3. I selected 'skip'.
      4. On the next screen I completed the task correctly and created a train that moved off screen.
      5. Feedback appeared that congratulated me and suggested that I try to make another train, but the 'next' button never became available.

     

    The [email protected] Federation is managed by Education Services Australia on behalf of the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA). Copyright.